Friday Cat Blogging – 25 September 2009

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Last night, while I was doing the NYT crossword puzzle, I thought for a while that the answer to one of the clues might be the word for an inability to get to sleep.  But I just couldn’t think of the word.  (And the answer turned out to be something else anyway.)  After I was finished, I turned off the light and went to bed — and then tossed and turned for an hour, unable to get to sleep because I was trying to remember the word for being unable to get to sleep.

Finally, I got up and went to lie down in the guest bedroom, thinking vaguely that a change of surrounding might work.  And it did!  I fell right to sleep.  An hour later, though, I woke up totally disoriented.  There was a box of stuff at my feet!  Why did Marian replace Domino with a box of stuff?  And there was no radio next to the bed.  Why did Marian steal my radio?!?  Then, just as I was feeling totally deranged, I shot up and realized where I was.  A diffent room entirely.  One without either a cat or a radio.  Whew.

So I went back to my usual bedroom and fell back asleep.  This morning, I woke up, went out to get the paper, and as I was halfway out to the sidewalk I suddenly thought, “Insomnia!”  Jeebus.  My brain is now officially defective.

This is a totally true story.  It has nothing to do with cats, though, aside from Domino’s absence from the guest bedroom.  And the fact that cats never seem to suffer from insomnia.  Not ours, anyway, who are currently doing their best beached whale imitations.  On Wednesday, however, they were out in the garden with us.  On the left, Domino is examining one of our plants.  On the right, Inkblot — who, unlike Domino, likes being held — is being hauled around while Marian searches for tomato worms.  In this picture, I think he’s staring at Domino, who has just passed by his field of vision and is obviously up to something he feels he should know more about.

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THE TRUTH...

is the first thing despots go after. An unwavering commitment to it is probably what draws you to Mother Jones' journalism. And as we're seeing in the US and the world around, authoritarians seek to poison the discourse and the way we relate to each other because they can't stand people coming together around a shared sense of the truth—it's a huge threat to them.

Which is also a pretty great way to describe Mother Jones' mission: People coming together around the truth to hold power accountable.

And right now, we need to raise about $400,000 from our online readers over the next two months to hit our annual goal and make good on that mission. Read more about the information war we find ourselves in and how people-powered, independent reporting can and must rise to the challenge—and please support our team's truth-telling journalism with a donation if you can right now.

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