A Bit of Sunshine From Cancun?

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Just got this direct tweet from one of MoJo’s editors:

Hey Kevin, you want to tweet/blog link to Kate’s Cancun wrap up?

Seriously? The Cancun climate talks? You’re trying to tell me that I shouldn’t have completely tuned them out weeks ago? That something actually happened there? Seriously? OK then. Let’s see what Kate Sheppard has to say:

Broadly, the agreement accomplishes most of what observers hoped it would heading in two weeks ago: It records the commitments to cut greenhouse gas emissions that developed and developing countries made in Copenhagen, establishes a framework for transparency, sets up a global climate fund with the goal of providing $100 billion in financing to developing countries by 2020, and establishes an initiative aimed at curbing deforestation.

Um, what? Actual progress? Granted, it was fairly modest progress, and apparently a decision to extend the binding Kyoto limits on greenhouse gas emissions was kicked down the road another year. As Sivan Kartha, a senior scientist with the Stockholm Environment Institute in Boston, says, it’s not clear whether that one-year delay on a decision will serve as “a lifeline or a noose” for Kyoto.

Still, read the whole thing. I’ve been in such a deep funk over climate change for the past six months that I’ve barely paid any attention to it at all. I have a feeling I’m not the only one. But Kate quotes EU commissioner for climate action Connie Hedegaard, who says last year’s failure at Copenhagen might have opened a few eyes. “The major difference is that people this year realized if we didn’t get a result here the process risked dying,” she said. “Basically it was the political will that changed.”

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In “TITLE TK” Monica Bauerlein writes about the perilous moment we’re in, and why it’s so important that we raise $325,000 by the time November’s midterms are decided so we can be ready to throw everything we have at the big issues facing the nation no matter what happens. Please help MoJo’s people-powered journalism with a donation today.

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Fact:

In-depth journalism that investigates the powerful takes real money and is so damn important right now.But it doesn’t take a Mother Jones investigation to know that billionaires and corporations will never fund the type of reporting (like they do politicians) we do that exists to help bring about change. Instead, our mission-driven journalism is made possible by people power, and has been for 46 years now since our founding as a non-profit.

In “TITLE TK” Monica Bauerlein writes about the perilous moment we’re in, and why it’s so important that we raise $325,000 by the time November’s midterms are decided so we can be ready to throw everything we have at the big issues facing the nation no matter what happens. Please help MoJo’s people-powered journalism with a donation today.

$400,000 to go!

payment methods

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