Rick Perry Wants You to Think He’s the Gipper

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Your mission tonight: watch Rick Perry’s debate performance and decide if it’s really Reaganesque. Pollster Matt Towery, a former national debate champion, says he’s sure trying to make it look that way:

“Every time someone says something, he cocks his head with a little smile on his face,” Towery said. “Reagan would always move his head to one side and act as if he couldn’t quite believe what the other person was saying. I guarantee that’s what he’s trying to do.”

OK. I’ll keep my eyes open for that. And as long as we’re talking about debates, let’s also explode a myth. Here’s the conclusion of the article:

By now it’s a faded memory, but the first televised presidential debate in 1960, between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon, signaled the dawn of a new age of judgment on the part of debate watchers, one that launched a thousand image-consultant careers.

Nixon, sweating under the hot TV lights, his five o’clock shadow visible, seemed nervous and shifty compared with Kennedy, who bore an easy smile and suave demeanor. People remember that Kennedy won the debate. That was true for TV viewers. Radio listeners, immune to Kennedy’s visual appeal, gave the win to the sweaty guy.

This myth was seriously called into question a long time ago. The polling evidence is extremely thin to begin with — basically a single small survey that showed radio audiences with a better opinion of Nixon — and it’s unclear whether even that survey can be trusted. By 1960, TV was so widespread that its audience was fundamentally different from the radio audience, which by then was mostly rural, conservative, Protestant, and — quite likely — predisposed to like Nixon in the first place. Nixon’s sweaty brow and pale demeanor might have hurt him with the TV audience, but the evidence on this score is close to nonexistent.

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THE TRUTH...

is the first thing despots go after. An unwavering commitment to it is probably what draws you to Mother Jones' journalism. And as we're seeing in the US and the world around, authoritarians seek to poison the discourse and the way we relate to each other because they can't stand people coming together around a shared sense of the truth—it's a huge threat to them.

Which is also a pretty great way to describe Mother Jones' mission: People coming together around the truth to hold power accountable.

And right now, we need to raise about $400,000 from our online readers over the next two months to hit our annual goal and make good on that mission. Read more about the information war we find ourselves in and how people-powered, independent reporting can and must rise to the challenge—and please support our team's truth-telling journalism with a donation if you can right now.

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