Harry Reid Goes Sub-Nuclear

For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.

Harry Reid, in a fit of spinefulness, killed off a Senate rule last night. There are really only two things you need to know about this:

  1. The rule itself was an obscure and trivial delaying tactic that, until now, neither party had used for decades. It does not directly affect either cloture or the filibuster, so stop drooling.
  2. The rule was eliminated by a majority vote that overturned a ruling of the parliamentarian.

#1 doesn’t matter. (Though details are here if you’re a masochist.) #2 might be a big deal. For starters, if you can change the Senate rules by simply overruling the parliamentarian on a majority vote, you can change pretty much any Senate rule by a majority vote. For seconders, Harry Reid actually got the entire Democratic caucus to go along with this. That’s…..sort of amazing.

No one knows how this is going to play out in the future. One possibility is that it’s a nothingburger. Overturning an obscure rule doesn’t set much of a precedent, and likewise, uniting the Democratic caucus over something so arcane doesn’t mean much either. Mitch McConnell and his friends will squawk, and then life will go back to normal. What’s more, the proposition that a parliamentarian’s ruling can be overturned on a majority vote isn’t really anything new. It hasn’t been used much, but it’s a precedent that’s been in place for decades.

Still, there’s at least the possibility that it’s very much a somethingburger. It might be something Republicans take advantage of if they win a Senate majority in the next election. In the nearer future, it might mean Democrats are finally figuring out that if they don’t hang together, they will assuredly all hang separately. If I had to guess, I’d vote that this is a nothingburger, but it’s worth keeping an eye on.

(It will, of course, also inspire Fox/Drudge/Tea Party shrieks about totalitarianism and Democratic thuggery, but that can be safely ignored. The real action will all be behind the scenes.)

Dear Reader,

This feels like the most important fundraising drive since I've been CEO of Mother Jones, with staggeringly high stakes and so much uncertainty. In "News Is Just Like Waste Management," I try to unpack the reality we all face and how we can rise to the challenge. If you're able to, this is a critical moment to support Mother Jones’ nonprofit journalism: We need to raise $400,000 to help cover the vital reporting projects we have planned, and right now is no time to pull back.

Monika Bauerlein, CEO, Mother Jones

Dear Reader,

This feels like the most important fundraising drive since I've been CEO of Mother Jones, with staggeringly high stakes and so much uncertainty. In "News Is Just Like Waste Management," I try to unpack the reality we all face and how we can rise to the challenge. If you're able to, this is a critical moment to support Mother Jones’ nonprofit journalism: We need to raise $400,000 to help cover the vital reporting projects we have planned, and right now is no time to pull back.

Monika Bauerlein, CEO, Mother Jones

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate