Why Does Everyone Think Lolita Is a Teenager?

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This is way off my usual beaten path, but here is Hillary Kelly in the New Republic:

People have the wrong idea about Lolita, and Lolita. Today, the name is widely used as a synonym for a sexually precocious young girl. But the most important fact of the novel is that Lolita is a 12-year-old girl….This makes the oversexed, hyper-titillating cover art that has been repeatedly slapped on Lolita incredibly bizarre—not to mention disturbing. We aren’t meant to find Lolita sexy. We shouldn’t find Lolita sexy. Nabokov himself said that readers were “misled” by the book’s repuation “into assuming this was going to be a lewd book.” I’m not so naïve as to imagine book covers always faithfully replicate the literary intentions of their authors. But Lolita covers aren’t simply exaggerated or oversimplified representations. They’re downright creepy.

Huh. I didn’t know that. But there’s a good reason for this: I’ve never read the book. Like a lot of people, however, I have seen the movie. And in the movie, Sue Lyon plays a teenage Lolita. So I always figured Lolita was indeed a high-school age girl. I don’t know if Stanley Kubrick made this decision for artistic reasons or—ah, wait. Sure enough, the ever-helpful Wikipedia informs me that “Lolita’s age was raised from twelve to early teens in the film to meet the MPAA standards. As such, Sue Lyon was chosen for the title role partly due to her more mature appearance.”

Anyway, I wonder if this is the wellspring of much of the common confusion? I’ll bet a whole lot more people have seen the movie than ever read the book.


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Fact:

In-depth journalism that investigates the powerful takes real money and is so damn important right now.But it doesn’t take a Mother Jones investigation to know that billionaires and corporations will never fund the type of reporting (like they do politicians) we do that exists to help bring about change. Instead, our mission-driven journalism is made possible by people power, and has been for 46 years now since our founding as a non-profit.

In “TITLE TK” Monica Bauerlein writes about the perilous moment we’re in, and why it’s so important that we raise $325,000 by the time November’s midterms are decided so we can be ready to throw everything we have at the big issues facing the nation no matter what happens. Please help MoJo’s people-powered journalism with a donation today.

$400,000 to go!

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