Godwin’s Law Has Taken a Beating Lately

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Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Tuesday:

Referring to the current cycle of violence, Netanyahu said Jews in Israel have faced attacks in the past — in 1920, 1921, 1929 — instigated by the “Mufti of Jerusalem,” Haj Amin al-Husseini, who allied himself with Adolf Hitler and the Nazis during World War II.

Then Netanyahu delivered this jaw-dropping assertion:

“Hitler didn’t want to exterminate the Jews at the time, he wanted to expel the Jews. And Haj Amin al-Husseini went to Hitler and said, ‘If you expel them, they’ll all come here.’ ‘So what should I do with them?’ he asked. He said, ‘Burn them.’

Ben Carson thinks the Holocaust was partly the fault of the Jews for meekly giving up their guns and not fighting back hard enough. Netanyahu thinks it’s partly the fault of the Palestinians because Hitler met with one of them a couple of years after he started exterminating Jews.

Can we all just go back to obeying Godwin’s Law and blaming Hitler for everything? Thanks.

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We just wrapped up a shorter-than-normal, urgent-as-ever fundraising drive and we came up about $45,000 short of our $300,000 goal.

That means we're going to have upwards of $350,000, maybe more, to raise in online donations between now and June 30, when our fiscal year ends and we have to get to break-even. And even though there's zero cushion to miss the mark, we won't be all that in your face about our fundraising again until June.

So we urgently need this specific ask, what you're reading right now, to start bringing in more donations than it ever has. The reality, for these next few months and next few years, is that we have to start finding ways to grow our online supporter base in a big way—and we're optimistic we can keep making real headway by being real with you about this.

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And we hope you might consider pitching in before moving on to whatever it is you're about to do next. We really need to see if we'll be able to raise more with this real estate on a daily basis than we have been, so we're hoping to see a promising start.

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