Newt Gingrich Has Some Advice for the Republican Party

Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.


Via Steve Benen, I see that the Republican Party has released yet another autopsy of the past few elections. This one is written by Gingrich Productions, and Newt explains his thinking toward the end of the report:

At Gingrich Productions we felt that some very profound changes were underway and we knew we did not understand them. We had been as wrong as anyone else about the probable outcome of the 2012 election.

That’s some welcome humility, which isn’t really in character for Newt. Maybe someone else wrote that bit. In any case, what does Newt recommend? There are nods to minority outreach buried in the middle of the report, and lots of attention to the new technology of campaigning (micro-targeting, social media, etc.). But what’s at the very top? What does Newt really want to make sure people see? Here you go:

1. The wrong words cripple or kill. At least 5 Republican Senate candidates (Delaware, Missouri, Nevada, Indiana, Colorado) were defeated in 2010 and 2012 because they used language in a way that isolated them and alienated voters….

2. The right big idea or ideas, expressed in clear and simple language with the right tone, can win campaigns. Larry Hogan’s intense focus on cutting taxes while refusing to comment on controversial issues propelled him to a shockingly large and unexpected victory as Governor of Maryland….

3. Big Ideas can attract donations and the lack of ideas can make money irrelevant….

Yeesh. Big Ideas™ and Big Language™ have been Newt’s stock in trade for decades. He could have written this in his sleep. And all the stuff about new technology and social media has been obvious for years. Everyone is gaga over this stuff and has been since 2008. I sure hope the RNC didn’t pay very much for this report.

IT'S NOT THAT WE'RE SCREWED WITHOUT TRUMP:

"It's that we're screwed with or without him if we can't show the public that what we do matters for the long term," writes Mother Jones CEO Monika Bauerlein as she kicks off our drive to raise $350,000 in donations from readers by July 17.

This is a big one for us. It's our first time asking for an outpouring of support since screams of FAKE NEWS and so much of what Trump stood for made everything we do so visceral. Like most newsrooms, we face incredibly hard budget realities, and it's unnerving needing to raise big money when traffic is down.

So, as we ask you to consider supporting our team's journalism, we thought we'd slow down and check in about where Mother Jones is and where we're going after the chaotic last several years. This comparatively slow moment is also an urgent one for Mother Jones: You can read more in "Slow News Is Good News," and if you're able to, please support our team's hard-hitting journalism and help us reach our big $350,000 goal with a donation today.

payment methods

IT'S NOT THAT WE'RE SCREWED WITHOUT TRUMP:

"It's that we're screwed with or without him if we can't show the public that what we do matters for the long term," writes Mother Jones CEO Monika Bauerlein as she kicks off our drive to raise $350,000 in donations from readers by July 17.

This is a big one for us. So, as we ask you to consider supporting our team's journalism, we thought we'd slow down and check in about where Mother Jones is and where we're going after the chaotic last several years. This comparatively slow moment is also an urgent one for Mother Jones: You can read more in "Slow News Is Good News," and if you're able to, please support our team's hard-hitting journalism and help us reach our big $350,000 goal with a donation today.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate