The Five Best Moments of the Republican Convention: Thursday Edition

Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump, speaks during the final day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Thursday, July 21, 2016. Carolyn Kaster/AP Photo

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It’s over. Finally. Here are today’s five best moments:

  • Trump says blandly that he might not come to the aid of our NATO partners in the Baltics if Russia invades them. Mitch McConnell chalks this up to a “rookie mistake.” Newt Gringrich won’t even go that far: “Estonia is in the suburbs of St. Petersburg,” he says. “I’m not sure I would risk nuclear war.” How confidence inspiring.
  • Trump’s speech leaks hours early, upstaging the evening speakers. It is a stunningly dystopian description of a country in terminal decline, possibly the gloomiest speech ever given by a presidential contender.
  • Jerry Falwell Jr. passes along a strained joke his father told him. Dad was musing about being interviewed by Chelsea Clinton, who asked him what the biggest threats to the country are. He answered “Osama, Obama, and yo mama.” This went over well on the convention floor.
  • Trump pal Tom Barrack highlights one of the worst deals Trump ever made: overpaying for the Plaza Hotel and then being forced to sell it at a loss a few years later. This is supposedly an example of what a great dealmaker Trump is.
  • Trump tells America: “I am your voice.” And: “Nobody knows the system better than me, which is why I alone can fix it.” If this reminds you of the kind of thing a cult leader might say, you’re not alone. And the whole speech was spat out with a delivery that was scarily reminiscent of Mussolini or Fidel Castro.

By the end of Trump’s speech, his campaign slogan for the next three months was clear: “Make America Fear Again.” Buckle up.

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IT'S NOT THAT WE'RE SCREWED WITHOUT TRUMP:

"It's that we're screwed with or without him if we can't show the public that what we do matters for the long term," writes Mother Jones CEO Monika Bauerlein as she kicks off our drive to raise $350,000 in donations from readers by July 17.

This is a big one for us. So, as we ask you to consider supporting our team's journalism, we thought we'd slow down and check in about where Mother Jones is and where we're going after the chaotic last several years. This comparatively slow moment is also an urgent one for Mother Jones: You can read more in "Slow News Is Good News," and if you're able to, please support our team's hard-hitting journalism and help us reach our big $350,000 goal with a donation today.

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