Al Franken Recounts the Extraordinary Moments Leading Up to Health Care Vote

The Minnesota senator also reveals when he realized John McCain might vote “no.”

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) appeared on the Late Show on Tuesday to unpack the dramatic moments leading up to last week’s health care vote, telling Stephen Colbert that he had a hunch Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) might shoot down the Republican bill to repeal Obamacare when a certain someone left the chamber.

“He didn’t want to be at the scene of the murder?” Colbert joked.

“The last vote he was there for the entire vote,” Franken explained. “And he had left the room, and that told me that [McCain] was going to vote no.”

Watch below to see whose exit tipped it all off:

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