Bush’s New Family Planning Czar: Like Appointing Dennis Kucinich as SecDef

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To run the federal government’s family planning program–no fewer than $283 million in funds serving low-income women nationwide–President Bush has picked Ed Keroack, an ob-gyn who has been running a crisis pregnancy center in Massachusetts that opposes birth control. Not a huge surprise, perhaps, coming from a president who seems to have it in for contraception generally (or at least understands that many of his supporters have moved from fighting abortion to fighting birth control in general). But still. Sometimes you wish it was true about laughter being the best birth control.

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