Justice for Thai Drug War Victims?

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The families of thousands of Thai citizens slaughtered in a 2003 government assault on alleged drug dealers may finally get a measure of justice. Gen. Surayud Chulanont, Thailand’s new prime minister who seized power in a recent coup, has pledged to look into dozens of cases in which families of those killed in the crackdown by the former government have lodged formal complaints. Thai human rights groups say the former prime minister gave security forces a “license to kill” in the anti-drug campaigns. To date, not a single person has been prosecuted for the 2,600 killings they carried out.

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