Presidential Campaigns Using Lots of Inappropriate Songs

Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.


mojo-photo-campaignsongs.jpg

I posted on the night of the New Hampshire primaries that the Romney campaign headquarters hosted a performance of Stone Temple Pilots’ “Crush,” a song that features both some ironically appropriate lyrics and some uncomfortably weird ones. Turns out that using inappropriate songs is a bit of an epidemic in the presidential campaigns, reports the Washington Post. First, they point out two of Hillary Clinton’s choices for tunes at campaign rallies: Tom Petty’s “American Girl” and Bachman Turner Overdrive’s “Takin’ Care of Business,” both of which have some uncomfortable lyrical ironies:

The title of the first song suggests a kind of patriotic autobiography. The second is supposed to say something about Clinton’s can-do style. Except that “Takin’ Care of Business” is actually about not taking care of business. The ’70s-era rock number (which George W. Bush also used in a 2004 campaign video) is from the point of view of a slacker: “People see you having fun/Just a-lying in the sun/Tell them that you like it this way.” The lyrics go on to add, “It’s the work that we avoid/And we’re all self-employed/We love to work at nothing all day.” … “American Girl” is about an American girl, all right. But it’s not about her patriotism. It’s about the shattering of her romantic dreams: “And for one desperate moment there/He crept back in her memory/God, it’s so painful/Something that’s so close/And still so far out of reach.”

Of course, the article points out, George W. Bush had a hard time using any music at campaign rallies, since artists including Bruce Springsteen, John Mellencamp, Orleans, Tom Petty, and Sting complained about Bush using their songs. While Clinton hasn’t been playing their Celine Dion track much lately, that choice in and of itself should have been enough to make anyone an Obama supporter, although as Gary points out below, there’s no accounting for taste.

IT'S NOT THAT WE'RE SCREWED WITHOUT TRUMP:

"It's that we're screwed with or without him if we can't show the public that what we do matters for the long term," writes Mother Jones CEO Monika Bauerlein as she kicks off our drive to raise $350,000 in donations from readers by July 17.

This is a big one for us. It's our first time asking for an outpouring of support since screams of FAKE NEWS and so much of what Trump stood for made everything we do so visceral. Like most newsrooms, we face incredibly hard budget realities, and it's unnerving needing to raise big money when traffic is down.

So, as we ask you to consider supporting our team's journalism, we thought we'd slow down and check in about where Mother Jones is and where we're going after the chaotic last several years. This comparatively slow moment is also an urgent one for Mother Jones: You can read more in "Slow News Is Good News," and if you're able to, please support our team's hard-hitting journalism and help us reach our big $350,000 goal with a donation today.

payment methods

IT'S NOT THAT WE'RE SCREWED WITHOUT TRUMP:

"It's that we're screwed with or without him if we can't show the public that what we do matters for the long term," writes Mother Jones CEO Monika Bauerlein as she kicks off our drive to raise $350,000 in donations from readers by July 17.

This is a big one for us. So, as we ask you to consider supporting our team's journalism, we thought we'd slow down and check in about where Mother Jones is and where we're going after the chaotic last several years. This comparatively slow moment is also an urgent one for Mother Jones: You can read more in "Slow News Is Good News," and if you're able to, please support our team's hard-hitting journalism and help us reach our big $350,000 goal with a donation today.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate