Nonprofit to Colorado GOPer: Give Us Our Money Back, You Plagiarizer

Would you buy a used car from this man? | Flickr/<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/scottmcinnis/3677834834/">scottmcinnis</a> (<a href="http://www.creativecommons.org">Creative Commons</a>).

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It’s been a pleasant news cycle for John Hickenlooper. The Denver Mayor is the Dems’ candidate for Governor of Colorado, and his main opponent, GOPer Scott McInnis, has been accused of plagiarizing a whole bunch of stuff. Now the non-profit foundation that paid McInnis wants its $300,000 back, and the Colorado Statesman reports the foundation may get its wish:

“I have said since this matter was brought to my attention that the articles provided as part of the Hasan Family Foundation fellowship were faulty,” McInnis said in response to the foundation’s demand. “I explained how this problem arose, and I accepted responsibility.

“I apologized to the Hasans for this mistake, and I expressed my determination to make it right with my dear friends. I will be in contact with the Hasan family to make full payment arrangements. I agree with the Foundation that this brings this matter to a close, and I look forward to continuing to speak on the campaign trail about the critical issues facing all of Colorado, including jobs and economic recovery.”

McInnis’ “explanation” of “how this problem arose” consists of blaming it all on his research assistant, Rolly Fischer, who says McInnis is lying. Fischer told a local news station that he “never knew about the foundation or any foundation Scott was associated with” and “had this sophomoric assumption that he wanted [the articles Fischer had gathered] for his own inventory.”

If I worked for the Hasans, I’d be happy to be getting my money back (which is essentially an admission of wrongdoing), but I’d still be annoyed. Even if McInnis’ story is accurate, and Fischer is lying, McInnis still apparently failed to do all the work he was paid $300,000 to do. Now McInnis is back on the trail and “ready to fight.” Is he going to get someone else to do that for him, too? 

WE CAME UP SHORT.

We just wrapped up a shorter-than-normal, urgent-as-ever fundraising drive and we came up about $45,000 short of our $300,000 goal.

That means we're going to have upwards of $350,000, maybe more, to raise in online donations between now and June 30, when our fiscal year ends and we have to get to break-even. And even though there's zero cushion to miss the mark, we won't be all that in your face about our fundraising again until June.

So we urgently need this specific ask, what you're reading right now, to start bringing in more donations than it ever has. The reality, for these next few months and next few years, is that we have to start finding ways to grow our online supporter base in a big way—and we're optimistic we can keep making real headway by being real with you about this.

Because the bottom line: Corporations and powerful people with deep pockets will never sustain the type of journalism Mother Jones exists to do. The only investors who won’t let independent, investigative journalism down are the people who actually care about its future—you.

And we hope you might consider pitching in before moving on to whatever it is you're about to do next. We really need to see if we'll be able to raise more with this real estate on a daily basis than we have been, so we're hoping to see a promising start.

payment methods

WE CAME UP SHORT.

We just wrapped up a shorter-than-normal, urgent-as-ever fundraising drive and we came up about $45,000 short of our $300,000 goal.

That means we're going to have upwards of $350,000, maybe more, to raise in online donations between now and June 30, when our fiscal year ends and we have to get to break-even. And even though there's zero cushion to miss the mark, we won't be all that in your face about our fundraising again until June.

So we urgently need this specific ask, what you're reading right now, to start bringing in more donations than it ever has. The reality, for these next few months and next few years, is that we have to start finding ways to grow our online supporter base in a big way—and we're optimistic we can keep making real headway by being real with you about this.

Because the bottom line: Corporations and powerful people with deep pockets will never sustain the type of journalism Mother Jones exists to do. The only investors who won’t let independent, investigative journalism down are the people who actually care about its future—you.

And we hope you might consider pitching in before moving on to whatever it is you're about to do next. We really need to see if we'll be able to raise more with this real estate on a daily basis than we have been, so we're hoping to see a promising start.

payment methods

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