All Quiet in Benghazi…for Now

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I just spoke to a friend’s husband who is in Benghazi. He’s Libyan, works there and in Europe, and his family is in this city, the second largest in the Libya. He asks that I don’t use his name—because Muammar Qaddafi is not gone yet (and though he’ll eventually return to Europe, his relatives won’t). He reports:

* Benghazi is quiet and safe. Shops and banks—though not schools—were open today. He had no trouble driving throughout the city. “Everybody’s fine,” he says. I’ts very safe… Unbelievably. Nobody is afraid of Qaddafi like before.”

* The Internet is not functioning in the city. International phone service is sketchy. Many residents are receiving and watching Al Jazeera.

* The city is being governed by an ad hoc assortment of military people, police, past government officials, and groups of citizens.

* There is a major fear shared by the residents of Benghazi: that Qaddafi will launch an air assault on the city. My friend’s husband notes that the military guarding the city does not possess anti-aircraft guns. He says that because Qaddafi was distrustful of this region, he did not supply the military based there with large amounts of weaponry. “We cannot fight back against an air attack,” he says.

* The residents of Benghazi have been trying to follow what’s happening in Tripoli. “I was able to talk to a friend in Tripoli,” he notes. “He told me, ‘It’s hell in Tripoli. There’s shooting everywhere. Qaddafi’s mafia is shooting people everywhere in the city.'”

He’s hopeful that the violence in Libya—a friend of his was shot and killed in Benghazi—will soon be over and Qaddafi gone. “In a couple of days,” he says, “everything will be finished.”

HERE ARE THE FACTS:

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ONE MORE QUICK THING:

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As we wrote over the summer, traffic has been down at Mother Jones and a lot of sites with many people thinking news is less important now that Donald Trump is no longer president. But if you're reading this, you're not one of those people, and we're hoping we can rally support from folks like you who really get why our reporting matters right now. And that's how it's always worked: For 45 years now, a relatively small group of readers (compared to everyone we reach) who pitch in from time to time has allowed Mother Jones to do the type of journalism the moment demands and keep it free for everyone else.

Please pitch in with a donation during our fall fundraising drive if you can. We can't afford to come up short, and there's still a long way to go by November 5.

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