Wonder Woman Wants Education Reform in Chile Now!

A "protest kiss" during a July education-reform rally in Santiago, Chile.<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/horment/5939392774/">Erwin Horment</a>/Flickr

Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.


While Chile’s recent string of student protests has had its fair share of water cannons sprayed and Molotov cocktails hurled, there have been a good deal of bloodless—and downright entertaining—demonstrations as well.

Young Chilean protesters, calling for increased funding for public education and lower university fees, choreographed and staged elaborate song-and-dance routines in the capital, Santiago, this week. The real kicker? The college kids and high schoolers were decked-out in colorful comic book costumes and superhero attire, BBC News reports.

Batman, Superman, Mario, Wonder Woman, Catwoman (who actually looked more like Lady Gaga on a bad morning), Poison Ivy, and a few jolly pirates all made appearances, while C+C Music Factory’s “Gonna Make You Sweat” was blasted for good measure.

The protest—the latest in a series of demonstrations that began in June—was organized after news of a cabinet reshuffle by center-right President Sebastián Piñera, whose approval rating has sunk to the low-30s.

Chilean students appear to have a fondness for creative protesting. In early July, students in Concepción orchestrated a mass “kiss-in,” in which 2,000 demonstrators gathered in front of city courts to suck face in support of eliminating for-profit control of their education system. (It was kind of like a larger, less chaotic version of the osculating couple photographed during the Vancouver Stanley Cup riots.)

The only thing that would have made either of these rallies more stimulating was if the Chileans took a cue from Ukrainian protesters and went topless.

Watch footage of the superhero-dance-protest below:

IT'S NOT THAT WE'RE SCREWED WITHOUT TRUMP:

"It's that we're screwed with or without him if we can't show the public that what we do matters for the long term," writes Mother Jones CEO Monika Bauerlein as she kicks off our drive to raise $350,000 in donations from readers by July 17.

This is a big one for us. It's our first time asking for an outpouring of support since screams of FAKE NEWS and so much of what Trump stood for made everything we do so visceral. Like most newsrooms, we face incredibly hard budget realities, and it's unnerving needing to raise big money when traffic is down.

So, as we ask you to consider supporting our team's journalism, we thought we'd slow down and check in about where Mother Jones is and where we're going after the chaotic last several years. This comparatively slow moment is also an urgent one for Mother Jones: You can read more in "Slow News Is Good News," and if you're able to, please support our team's hard-hitting journalism and help us reach our big $350,000 goal with a donation today.

payment methods

IT'S NOT THAT WE'RE SCREWED WITHOUT TRUMP:

"It's that we're screwed with or without him if we can't show the public that what we do matters for the long term," writes Mother Jones CEO Monika Bauerlein as she kicks off our drive to raise $350,000 in donations from readers by July 17.

This is a big one for us. So, as we ask you to consider supporting our team's journalism, we thought we'd slow down and check in about where Mother Jones is and where we're going after the chaotic last several years. This comparatively slow moment is also an urgent one for Mother Jones: You can read more in "Slow News Is Good News," and if you're able to, please support our team's hard-hitting journalism and help us reach our big $350,000 goal with a donation today.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate