10 Green New Year’s Resolutions for 2012

Will you ride your bike to work more often in 2012?<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/vonderauvisuals/6551034999/sizes/z/in/photostream/" target="_blank">vonderauvisuals</a>/Flickr

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Happy 2012! Now that the champagne toasts are made and the ball dropped, it’s time to start thinking ahead: What’s your green resolution for this year? We asked you to submit yours, from big (solar panels on the house!) to small (not driving to the supermarket that’s embarrassingly close to home). Here are 10 of our favorites:

 

 

 

  1. “Going red meat free. I am not quite ready to take the next step into full-on vegetarianism just yet, but this is a big start. The beef industry, while very important to my state (Kansas) is a lead producer of waste, greenhouse gases, and more. Plus, the stuff they put IN beef these days is really not good for the human body. As a cancer survivor at 32, I’d really like to avoid having to go through it again.” —Christina A.
     
  2. “Ride bicycle or walk to work more often (commute is 4.2 miles).” —Daniel B.
     
  3. “Last year, my chickens ate my garden, so we will be building a chicken coop instead of letting them free, although they did a great job: I did not see one grasshopper or earwig all summer.” —Melissa S.

  4. “Convince husband to try Meatless Mondays.” —Miranda S.
     
  5. “Buying paper books hurts the environment and my wallet. This year, I’m going to hit my local library. I can even borrow e-books from it.” —Elizabeth R.
     
  6. “Buying everything except food and TP second-hand.” —Wendy W.

  7. I want to reduce the amount of food I waste by buying smaller quantities and finding creative ways to use ingredients I already have on hand.” —Ilana G.

  8. “Hook up the rain barrel that has been in my garage since I moved a year ago.” —Tasia M.
     
  9. “Saving money early in the year so I can do u-pick berries and such over the summer and freeze massive quantities for use in the winter. “ —Megan H.
     
  10. “Moving to a town with a high walkability score & shared commuting options for work! My car will be happily neglected.” —Abby A.

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Fact:

In-depth journalism that investigates the powerful takes real money and is so damn important right now.But it doesn’t take a Mother Jones investigation to know that billionaires and corporations will never fund the type of reporting (like they do politicians) we do that exists to help bring about change. Instead, our mission-driven journalism is made possible by people power, and has been for 46 years now since our founding as a non-profit.

In “TITLE TK” Monica Bauerlein writes about the perilous moment we’re in, and why it’s so important that we raise $325,000 by the time November’s midterms are decided so we can be ready to throw everything we have at the big issues facing the nation no matter what happens. Please help MoJo’s people-powered journalism with a donation today.

$400,000 to go!

payment methods

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