Ouch! “Salt Lake Tribune,” Citing Romney’s 47-Percent Rant, Endorses Obama

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Mitt Romney is in no danger of losing Utah to President Barack Obama. But this has to hurt: on Friday the Salt Lake Tribune endorsed Obama over the quasi-adopted son of the Beehive State. The editorial starts off fine for Romney:

Nowhere has Mitt Romney’s pursuit of the presidency been more warmly welcomed or closely followed than here in Utah. The Republican nominee’s political and religious pedigrees, his adeptly bipartisan governorship of a Democratic state, and his head for business and the bottom line all inspire admiration and hope in our largely Mormon, Republican, business-friendly state.

But it was Romney’s singular role in rescuing Utah’s organization of the 2002 Olympics from a cesspool of scandal, and his oversight of the most successful Winter Games on record, that make him the Beehive State’s favorite adopted son.

Then the Tribune slams him as an opportunistic and untrustworthy shape-shifter:

From his embrace of the party’s radical right wing, to subsequent portrayals of himself as a moderate champion of the middle class, Romney has raised the most frequently asked question of the campaign: “Who is this guy, really, and what in the world does he truly believe?”

The evidence suggests no clear answer, or at least one that would survive Romney’s next speech or sound bite. Politicians routinely tailor their words to suit an audience. Romney, though, is shameless, lavishing vastly diverse audiences with words, any words, they would trade their votes to hear.

It gets worse. The paper ridicules his refusal to provide specifics for his tax plan. And it ends with Romney’s 47-percent rant:

If this portrait of a Romney willing to say anything to get elected seems harsh, we need only revisit his branding of 47 percent of Americans as freeloaders who pay no taxes, yet feel victimized and entitled to government assistance. His job, he told a group of wealthy donors, “is not to worry about those people. I’ll never convince them they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives.”

Where, we ask, is the pragmatic, inclusive Romney, the Massachusetts governor who left the state with a model health care plan in place, the Romney who led Utah to Olympic glory? That Romney skedaddled and is nowhere to be found.

They say you’re never a hero in your own hometown. But here’s a case in which Romney is pummeled by those who know him well and who yearn for the Romney they once saw. That Romney is long gone.

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