California’s Kamala Harris Just Became the Fourth Woman of Color to Be Elected US Senator

She’s been called the “next Barack Obama.”

AP Photo/Eric Risberg

Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.


Kamala Harris, who gained a reputation as a potential “next Barack Obama,” during her tenure as California’s attorney general, won the race for an open California Senate seat against Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Calif.).

The seat was vacated by Sen. Barbara Boxer, who served four terms before retiring. Harris announced her candidacy days after Boxer’s announcement in January last year. It was the first open seat in California since 1992.

Harris is a Bay Area native who made history in 2003 when she became the first black woman and the first South Asian woman to be elected as San Francisco district attorney. She was reelected in 2007, and in 2011 she became California’s attorney general, serving as one of only two black female Democrats in statewide office. In 2013, President Obama—who would later endorse Harris for Senate—praised her work as attorney general, calling her “brilliant,” “dedicated,” and “tough.”

In an interview with Mother Jones, Harris said she has experienced sexism and racism over the course of her political career, but she’s never let it influence her.

“As a female prosecutor, let alone a woman of color, there have definitely been moments where people said, ‘No, you can’t do that,'” she said. “Well, I eat ‘no’ for breakfast, and I’ve never been a fan of the word ‘can’t’—aimed at me or anyone else.”

Harris was one of 13 women to run for Senate for the first time in 2016. One of those women, Loretta Sanchez, was Harris’ opponent. Had Sanchez won, she would have been the first Latina to serve in the US Senate.

HERE ARE THE FACTS:

Our fall fundraising drive is off to a rough start, and we very much need to raise $250,000 in the next couple of weeks. If you value the journalism you get from Mother Jones, please help us do it with a donation today.

As we wrote over the summer, traffic has been down at Mother Jones and a lot of sites with many people thinking news is less important now that Donald Trump is no longer president. But if you're reading this, you're not one of those people, and we're hoping we can rally support from folks like you who really get why our reporting matters right now. And that's how it's always worked: For 45 years now, a relatively small group of readers (compared to everyone we reach) who pitch in from time to time has allowed Mother Jones to do the type of journalism the moment demands and keep it free for everyone else.

Please pitch in with a donation during our fall fundraising drive if you can. We can't afford to come up short, and there's still a long way to go by November 5.

payment methods

ONE MORE QUICK THING:

Our fall fundraising drive is off to a rough start, and we very much need to raise $250,000 in the next couple of weeks. If you value the journalism you get from Mother Jones, please help us do it with a donation today.

As we wrote over the summer, traffic has been down at Mother Jones and a lot of sites with many people thinking news is less important now that Donald Trump is no longer president. But if you're reading this, you're not one of those people, and we're hoping we can rally support from folks like you who really get why our reporting matters right now. And that's how it's always worked: For 45 years now, a relatively small group of readers (compared to everyone we reach) who pitch in from time to time has allowed Mother Jones to do the type of journalism the moment demands and keep it free for everyone else.

Please pitch in with a donation during our fall fundraising drive if you can. We can't afford to come up short, and there's still a long way to go by November 5.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate