An American Journalist Is the Latest Casualty of Russia’s Ukraine Invasion

Brent Renaud was killed and his colleague was wounded while reporting in Ukraine.

Journalist and filmmaker Brent RenaudJimi Celeste/Getty

Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.

American journalist Brent Renaud was shot and killed while reporting on the Russian invasion of Ukraine in a town outside of Kyiv, Ukrainian officials said on Sunday. His colleague, photographer Juan Arredondo, was also wounded, according to reports.

Renaud is among the first Americans to perish in the bloody conflict, during which thousands of people are estimated to have died since Russia invaded its neighbor about three weeks ago. According to the head of Kyiv’s regional police force, Andriy Nebytov, Russian forces fired upon Renaud, killing him, CBS News reported. On Facebook, Nebytov reportedly shared what he says is are photos of Renaud’s body, his passport, and media credentials from the New York Times. (Renaud had worked with the New York Times in the past, but “was not on assignment for the company in Ukraine,” a Times report reads.)

In a video posted by a Kyiv hospital spokesperson and shared by CBS News, Arredondo describes the attack: “Somebody offered to take us to the other bridge, and we crossed a checkpoint, and they started shooting at us,” Arredondo says in the video. “So the driver turned around, and they kept shooting, it was two of us. My friend is Brent Renaud, and he’s been shot and left behind…I saw him being shot in the neck, and we got split.”

PBS Newshour correspondent Jane Ferguson also witnessed the aftermath of Renaud’s death. “Just left roadside spot near Irpin where body of American journalist Brent Renaud lay under a blanket,” she tweeted, the Guardian reported. “Ukrainian medics could do nothing to help him by that stage. Outraged Ukrainian police officer: ‘Tell America, tell the world, what they did to a journalist.’”

Renaud was an award-winning filmmaker, who, in addition to reporting for the New York Times, worked with HBO and NBC, among other outlets. Here’s the New York Times:

Mr. Renaud often worked with his brother, Craig Renaud, and won a Peabody award for a Vice News documentary about a school in Chicago. The two have worked on film and television projects from conflict zones and hot spots around the world.

Over the past decade, the brothers had covered the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the earthquake in Haiti, cartel violence in Mexico and youth refugees in Central America, according to their website.

Mr. Renaud was a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University from 2018 to 2019. Ann Marie Lipinski, curator of the Nieman Foundation, posted on Twitter on Sunday that Mr. Renaud “was gifted and kind, and his work was infused with humanity.” Lamenting his death, she said that “the world and journalism are lesser for it.”

Fact:

In-depth journalism that investigates the powerful takes real money and is so damn important right now.But it doesn’t take a Mother Jones investigation to know that billionaires and corporations will never fund the type of reporting (like they do politicians) we do that exists to help bring about change. Instead, our mission-driven journalism is made possible by people power, and has been for 46 years now since our founding as a non-profit.

In “TITLE TK” Monica Bauerlein writes about the perilous moment we’re in, and why it’s so important that we raise $325,000 by the time November’s midterms are decided so we can be ready to throw everything we have at the big issues facing the nation no matter what happens. Please help MoJo’s people-powered journalism with a donation today.

$400,000 to go!

payment methods

Fact:

In-depth journalism that investigates the powerful takes real money and is so damn important right now.But it doesn’t take a Mother Jones investigation to know that billionaires and corporations will never fund the type of reporting (like they do politicians) we do that exists to help bring about change. Instead, our mission-driven journalism is made possible by people power, and has been for 46 years now since our founding as a non-profit.

In “TITLE TK” Monica Bauerlein writes about the perilous moment we’re in, and why it’s so important that we raise $325,000 by the time November’s midterms are decided so we can be ready to throw everything we have at the big issues facing the nation no matter what happens. Please help MoJo’s people-powered journalism with a donation today.

$400,000 to go!

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate