The Police Failed, Says a Texas Congressional Report on Uvalde Mass Shooting

400 officers were present.

A family member of a shooting victim, is greeted by a friend after a city council meeting on Tuesday, July 12, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.AP Photo/Eric Gay

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In a new report, a Texas Congressional committee criticized the “systemic and egregious poor decision making”  of the local, state and federal law enforcement who were present at the Uvalde mass shooting, in which 21 people died, many of them young children.

“At Robb Elementary, law enforcement responders failed to adhere to their active shooter training, and they failed to prioritize saving innocent lives over their own safety,” the report reads. 

According to the document, 142 shots were fired in total, and its authors estimated that 100 of those shots happened before police ever entered the school. 400 officers were present, according to the report.

The 77-page document, which is the most comprehensive single accounting of the shooting to be done so far, is the first official criticism of state and federal law enforcement, in addition to local police, who have already been hammered for their response to the shooting. 

“These local officials were not the only ones expected to supply the leadership needed during this tragedy,” the report said. “Hundreds of responders from numerous law enforcement agencies—many of whom were better trained and better equipped than the school district police—quickly arrived on the scene.”

The report spread the blame across agencies for not stepping up to take command of the situation, instead of placing it solely on the Uvalde Police Department. Uvalde officials had previously tried to lobby state officials for a more favorable narrative on their response, the New York Times reported on Friday. According to a document labeled “narrative” reviewed by the paper, officials sought praise for offers rushing into the building to save the children trapped inside even though the officers hesitated on entering the building for an hour and 15 minutes.

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Fact:

In-depth journalism that investigates the powerful takes real money and is so damn important right now.But it doesn’t take a Mother Jones investigation to know that billionaires and corporations will never fund the type of reporting (like they do politicians) we do that exists to help bring about change. Instead, our mission-driven journalism is made possible by people power, and has been for 46 years now since our founding as a non-profit.

In “TITLE TK” Monica Bauerlein writes about the perilous moment we’re in, and why it’s so important that we raise $325,000 by the time November’s midterms are decided so we can be ready to throw everything we have at the big issues facing the nation no matter what happens. Please help MoJo’s people-powered journalism with a donation today.

$400,000 to go!

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