Just Released: Read the DOJ’s Redacted Affidavit for Searching Trump’s Estate

There’s “probable cause to believe that evidence of obstruction will be found” at Mar-a-Lago, it states.

Jon Elswick/AP

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The Justice Department just released a redacted affidavit related to the search warrant for former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago residence. The document provides more information about the justification for the warrant and the criminal investigation into confidential documents retrieved from the Florida estate. Affidavits typically remain sealed during pending investigations, but in this case the DOJ unsealed the affidavit in response to a court order following requests by media outlets to make the document public.

“[T]he materials the government marked for redaction…must remain sealed to protect the safety and privacy of a significant number of civilian witnesses, in addition to law enforcement personnel, as well as to protect the integrity of the ongoing investigation and to avoid disclosure of grand jury material in violation of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure,” the DOJ said in a 14-page memo explaining the reasoning behind the redactions.

But despite the redactions, there were some interesting revelations that surfaced in the affidavit. “There is probable cause to believe that additional documents that contain classified (National Defense Information) or that are Presidential records subject to record retention requirements currently remain at [Mar-a-Lago],” the affidavit says. “There is also probable cause to believe that evidence of obstruction will be found” there, it states. On Friday, Trump took to Truth Social to call the Justice Department and the FBI “political hacks and thugs” and criticized Judge Bruce Reinhart for allowing the raid. 

The affidavit shows that 14 out of 15 boxes recovered from Mar-a-Lago by the National Archives and Record Administration had 184 classified documents, 25 of which were marked as “top secret.” 

You can read the redacted affidavit here:

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In-depth journalism that investigates the powerful takes real money and is so damn important right now.But it doesn’t take a Mother Jones investigation to know that billionaires and corporations will never fund the type of reporting (like they do politicians) we do that exists to help bring about change. Instead, our mission-driven journalism is made possible by people power, and has been for 46 years now since our founding as a non-profit.

In “TITLE TK” Monica Bauerlein writes about the perilous moment we’re in, and why it’s so important that we raise $325,000 by the time November’s midterms are decided so we can be ready to throw everything we have at the big issues facing the nation no matter what happens. Please help MoJo’s people-powered journalism with a donation today.

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