Protesters Showed Up Outside Kavanaugh’s Home, and the Tone Police Lost Its Mind

“Asking for civility in the face of systemic violence is playing right into the oppressors’ hand.”

Jacquelyn Martin/AP

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According to plenty of tweets in my feed these past few days, it sure seems like a lot of people can excuse stripping people of their reproductive rights—but draw a hard line at noise complaints.

Following Politico’s blockbuster scoop last week of the Supreme Court’s draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, people took to the streets. Pro-choice protests sprung up all across the country over the weekend, from DC to Baltimore to Oakland. But what has gotten folks most riled up is that the protesters took their outrage straight to the source: the steps of Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s and Chief Justice John Roberts’ houses. 

Footage from various news outlets show that protesters, armed with raincoats and homemade signs with snappy, pro-choice slogans, gathered outside of the judges’ home to exercise their freedom of speech and assembly. While their anger and frustration were palpable, the protests were far from violent. Yet by the way some people have described the demonstrations outside Kavanaugh’s home, you would’ve sworn that the protesters ripped him and his family out of their beds and executed them in the middle of the street. (Spoiler alert: They didn’t.)

In a 13-second clip by Daily Signal news producer David Blair, you can see dozens of people standing outside of Kavanaugh’s house. They’re chanting, “We will not go back,” presumably to a time before abortions were safe and accessible.

According to Blair, this was “one of the scariest things I’ve ever witnessed.”

“This is an attempt at intimidation,” said Blair in an interview with Fox News, apparently clueless to the decades-long history of violent anti-abortion protests outside of clinics across America. “And I think it really says a lot, too, that the Biden administration is willing to absolutely let these justices out to dry. They’re not going to say, ‘It’s not acceptable for you to go to somebody’s house and yell and scream.’”

But Blair underestimated the power of milquetoast white liberalism. At 9 a.m. this morning, White House press secretary Jen Psaki tweeted the following in response to the demonstration:

Everyone from the far-right to the center-left seems to be way more concerned about the optics of the protests than the systemic injustices that people are protesting against. We saw something eerily similar with the racial-justice protests in response to the death of George Floyd in 2020. Remember Tucker Carlson describing the Black Lives Matter protesters as a “mob,” warning his viewers that the protesters will “come for them”? Or Eric Trump describing them as “animals” during one of his father’s campaign rallies? (And despite only 3.7 percent of protests containing violence or vandalism, several Democrats, including Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, stepped forward to condemn the violence at the demonstrations)

Asking for civility in the face of systemic violence is playing right into the oppressors’ hand. If we spend all of our time policing how people protest, then, conveniently, nothing will get done to attack the root of the issue. It’s nothing more than an attempt to derail the public conversation surrounding reproductive rights.

According to experts, if the courts overturn Roe, people’s lives will be at risk. Miscarriages could be criminalized. Abortion providers could be sued. But above all, people would be forced to carry unwanted pregnancies. This clearly is a sacrifice that the Supreme Court’s conservative justices are willing to make.

And if a Supreme Court justice losing a few hours of sleep seems worse to you than people dying from the complications of an unwanted pregnancy, it’s time to reevaluate your priorities. And to Kavanaugh, Roberts, and any other justices in favor of taking away people’s rights, if you can’t take the heat, stay out of people’s uteruses.

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This is no time to come up short. It's time to fight like hell, as our namesake would tell us to do, for a democracy where minority rule cannot impose an extreme agenda, where facts matter, and where accountability has a chance at the polls and in the press. If you value our reporting and you can right now, please help us dig out of the $100,000 hole we're starting our new budgeting cycle in with an always-needed and always-appreciated donation today.

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